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FAQ2019-07-31T16:06:48+00:00
The dog ate chocolate; now what?2019-06-27T17:56:04+00:00

A: Recently we fielded an emergency phone call from a dog owner. She was worried because when she arrived home from work, she found that her dog had consumed half a jar of Nutella. The 13-ounce jar was tipped on its side on the floor bearing all the signs of a canine lick-fest.

Knowing how panicked the owner must be, I wanted to figure out quickly if her dog had eaten a toxic dose. With chocolate it can be tough. Dark chocolate has more cocoa per ounce than milk, and a chocolate spread? Nutella has how much cocoa in it?

Googling Nutella did absolutely nothing to tell me how much cocoa was in the product. The ingredient that causes the bad side effects is methyl xanthine. I hopped on my Veterinary Information network and found a posting by an ER vet who knew that European Nutella has 8.5 % cocoa or 8.5 grams per 100 grams of product, and the US Nutella has 7 grams. Going with the worst-case scenario, I began the calculations. After triple-checking my math, I determined that the pup had eaten 450 mg of cocoa, or half the potential lethal dose.

A dose in this range could cause a racing heart and nervous tremors. A lethal dose could cause seizures and cardiac arrest. Her pup was showing no symptoms, but to be cautious we advised that he be examined. Since he had eaten the chocolate sometime during the day, the toxin had already been absorbed and inducing vomiting was not on the table. He did well treated with fluids and activated charcoal.

If you ever have a poisoning emergency there is a hotline you can call: the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, 888-426-4435. Their website is Here.

Is chocolate poisonous to dogs?2019-06-27T17:54:55+00:00

A: For dogs, a chemical in chocolate called theobromine is the source of the problem. Theobromine is similar to caffeine. Theobromine is toxic to a dog when it ingests between 100 and 150 milligrams per kilogram of body weight.

Different types of chocolate contain different amounts of theobromine: It would take 20 ounces of milk chocolate to kill a 20-pound dog, but only 2 ounces of baker’s chocolate or 6 ounces of semisweet chocolate. It is not that hard for a dog to get into something like an Easter basket full of chocolate eggs and bunnies and gobble up a pound or two of chocolate. If the dog is small, that could be deadly.

It turns out that chocolate poisoning is actually not as unusual as it sounds. For a human being, caffeine is toxic at levels of 150 milligrams per kilogram of body weight. That’s the same as for dogs! Humans generally weigh a lot more than dogs, but small children can get into trouble with caffeine or chocolate if they consume too much of it.

What are your kennels like?2019-06-27T17:53:21+00:00

A: Our dog kennels are all indoor. The dogs are walked 3 times daily while they are boarding. The cat boarders are housed in a separate area away from the dogs. Blankets and food are provided for our boarders, but you are always welcome to bring your own food.

Do you board pets?2019-06-27T17:50:12+00:00

A: Yes, we have separate boarding space for both dogs and cats.

What is the pre-anesthetic blood screening?2019-06-27T17:48:41+00:00

A: This is a blood test that is run here in the hospital prior to surgery. It tests the organ functions, blood counts and clotting function of your pet. The pre-anesthetic blood screening is done to assure safety during surgery and the ability to heal following surgery.

Can I make payments?2019-06-27T17:47:03+00:00

A: Payment in full is required at the time of service.

What forms of payment do you accept?2019-06-27T17:45:50+00:00

A: Cash, Check, Mastercard, Visa, Discover and American Express.

Do I need to have an appointment?2018-12-24T05:32:18+00:00

A: Yes, patients are seen by appointment. Should you have an emergency during regular office hours, please call so that we may assist you as quickly as possible.